Which Roofing Material is Right for Your Home?

Having a sturdy roof that looks attractive is one of the perks of owning a home. It might not seem like a big deal, but when people come to visit, they’ll notice. A good roof can make a home feel warm and inviting, but a bad one can turn your exterior into an awkward spectacle for passers-by. Some roofing choices are more cost-effective than others, but each of these popular styles comes with unique advantages that make it worth considering when building or renovating your home. Asphalt Shingles: The Most Popular Choice Asphalt is the most commonly seen option. It has been a staple of roofing for over 100 years and is best known for its ability to suit almost any style of home. Asphalt is also notable for its affordability; it tends to have one of the lowest costs for supply and installation. Asphalt comes in two varieties and two styles. As far as material goes, you can choose between fiberglass and organic. Fiberglass weighs less and is easier to install. Organics are denser and provide more resistance to high winds. Asphalt shingles come in architectural and 3-tab styles. Architectural shingles are thicker and come in more shapes and sizes. They’ve gained popularity in the last 30 years due to their durability and aesthetics. Unfortunately, they also cost more. 3-tabs are the most common choice. They’re lightweight, with a consistent shape, and are the most cost-efficient type of asphalt. If you’ve lived in an apartment complex, it’s likely that your building had 3-tab shingles. The low cost of asphalt means that these shingles can be prone to damage....

8 Signs Your House Needs New Siding

Siding protects your home from the outside elements. If the siding on your home has begun to rot or crumble, then it can no longer perform its vital role in protection. In cases of isolated damage, you may be able to repair only the affected area. However, if the rot has spread across the exterior, there’s nothing to do but start over, this time with a rot-resistant material. How do you know when it’s time to replace your siding? Here are the warning signs of poor siding and what to look for. Rotted Boards Rotting typically starts between the siding and the framing. When you inspect the siding, use a screwdriver to test the integrity of the board. Siding with wet rot will be soft and may fall apart when you push into it. Visible rot is a sure sign that your siding needs immediate replacement. Dry Rot This type of rot is different from wet rot. Dry rot is caused by a specific fungus. You likely won’t see it because the fungus needs moisture-rich areas, like the area between the siding and the framing. As you inspect for standard rot, tap the boards and listen for a hollow sound. Check for gray or white strands, which can indicate dry rot. Dry rot makes wood so brittle that it can crumble in your hands; if you discover it, you’ll need to replace your siding to fix the problem. Holes or Hail Damage Holes in the siding, whether drilled or caused by insects or wildlife, are never good news. If your siding has holes or hail damage, it can’t do...

Considering a “Do-It-Yourself” Roofing Project?

 A Few Things You Should Know Before Starting a DIY Roofing Project:   Mistakes: Mistakes during a DIY roof project can lead to costly repairs in the future. This is a common theme when we repair do-it-yourself jobs. The skills needed to properly replace shingles and repair roof leaks, take time to develop. Improperly installed shingles using the wrong tools and techniques can lead to serious problems with your roof down the road. If the professionals you hire do a bad job repairing the roof of your home, you can call them again, and they will do it for free. DIY roofing projects gone wrong will just lead to more costly repairs. Cost: Professional Roofers get business discounts for buying in bulk. You do not want to use inferior materials on your roof, which will need to be replaced again and you may end up spending twice the time and money on the project. If you factor in the value of your time and the cost of repairing your own roof, it is comparable to the cost of hiring experienced roofers to do the job right the first time. Danger: When it comes to roof repairs, whether it’s repairing a few shingles, or replacing your whole roof; it’s a dangerous and tedious job. DIY roof repairs are one of the most dangerous home projects to do yourself. The risk of falls due to a lack of special equipment such as anti-slip matting, helmets, and restraints. Not to mention most DIY projects are up against time restraints; mistakes happen when trying to rush through a job to complete it in...

Warning Signs of Roof Damage

How often do you check on your roof? You probably do it less frequently than you should. It’s easy to assume that everything outside is all fine and good until you discover interior damage, and by then it’s too late. Don’t worry—there are a few questions you can ask yourself to make sure you catch any damage to your roof before it turns a simple project into a major rescue operation. Do You Have All Your Shingles? This problem can be easy to miss, especially if you’ve lost a few shingles from hard-to-spot areas. This is also a problem that usually looks worse than it is. You might have noticed one or two missing shingles somewhere in the middle of your roof and decided that you would need a full roof repair to fix things. Generally speaking, most homes won’t require a total replacement; all you need to do is repair the areas you’re missing shingles from. Replacing them is a small project, and it saves the stress and expense of hiring a team to do more than what is required. There are a few ways that shingles can become loose and fall off. The most common is storm damage—a heavy wind mixed with rain or sleet pounding down on your roof can quickly create problems. If there are a few improperly installed shingles, they’ll be quick to disappear. Have You Inspected Your Flashing? It’s also common to overlook your flashing. Depending on the structure of your roof, it can be even more difficult to notice problems with your flashing than with your shingles. If your house has a...